Caroline Taggart

500 Words You Should Know

    Pseudonimkamembuat kutipan15 hari yang lalu
    This is a book for the logophile – the lover of words.
    Pseudonimkamembuat kutipan15 hari yang lalu
    Any person who does any unauthorized act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims for damages.
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    intellect to appreciation of sexual attraction, but its intriguing that this should be the shortest chapter in the book.
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    incarnate
    Born, ‘made flesh’ as in the devil incarnate – the devil, alive and well and walking the Earth. It may also mean the living embodiment of something unpleasant
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    imprecation
    An expletive, wishing ill on someone or something. It is often used to mean no more than a swear word – ‘He
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    ignominious
    Another ig- word (see previous entry); the nomin part comes from the Latin for name or reputation, so ignominy means shame, disgrace
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    gratuitous insult or a gratuitous sex scene. Not to be confused with gratuity, which means a tip (in the financial sense, something you might give a waiter or a taxi driver) or gratis, which means free, for nothing: ‘They were handing out the tickets gratis, but I still didn’t want to go.’

    grotesque
    A combination of distorted, distasteful and bizarre: ‘It’s grotesque to say that being a stay-at-home parent means you are sponging off society’ or ‘I had to turn off the wildlife film: those beetles with the bulging eyes were grotesque’ or ‘The feathers in that hat made her look positively grotesque.’ In architectural terms, grotesques – odd mixtures of human and animal forms – are often carved on the side of cathedrals and the like; they become gargoyles only if they are designed to
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    gratuitous
    Unnecessary, uncalled for, as in a gratuitous insult or a gratuitous sex scene. Not to be confused with gratuity, which means a tip (in the financial sense, something you might give a waiter or a taxi driver) or gratis, which means free, for nothing: ‘They were handing out the tickets gratis, but I still didn’t want to go.’

    grotesque
    A combination of distorted, distasteful and bizarre: ‘It’s grotesque to say that being a stay-at-home parent means you are sponging off society’ or ‘I had to turn off the wildlife film: those beetles with the bulging eyes were grotesque’ or ‘The feathers in that hat made her look positively grotesque.’ In architectural terms, grotesques – odd mixtures of human and animal forms – are often carved on the side of cathedrals and the like; they become gargoyles only if they are designed to
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    fallacious
    In logic a fallacy is an error of reasoning that produces a misleading conclusion; fallacious therefore means illogical, misleading, as i
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    cantankerous
    One of those lovely words that means just what it sounds as if it should mean: bad-tempered, complaining, likely to pick a quarrel at the slightest provocation. It’s frequently applied to an elderly person who refuses to move with the times: a cantankerous old man (
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    amoral
    This is often wrongly used as a synonym for immoral, but the distinction is worth preserving. The immoral person ignores morals, goes against accepted rules; the amoral one doesn’t consider the rules relevant or even recognize that they exist
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    vivacious
    As URBANE is more often applied to a man, so vivaciousness or vivacity tends to be a characteristic of young women. Vivacious means lively, high spirited, and can be used to describe a person, their personality or other attributes
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    pellucid
    Related to lucid, ‘clear’, with a prefix meaning through, this means ‘shining through, very clear indeed’. A lake may be described as pellucid, if the water is so clean and still that you can see right to the bottom; so too may a writing style or an argument in which you understand every word
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    inimitable
    That cannot be imitated, in a class of its own – used very much in an admiring way. A collection of P. G. Wodehouse’s s
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    indispensable
    That which cannot be dispensed with, can’t be done without.
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    impeccable
    Literally ‘unable to sin’, this more usually means ‘faultless’ and can apply to anything from your dress sense and DEMEANOUR (impeccably turned out, impeccable
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    The opposite of a euphemism is a dysphemism, deliberately saying something in an unpleasant or unsympathetic way: ‘kicked the bucket’ or ‘snuffed it’ are dysphemisms for ‘died’. See also DYSTOPIA
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    erudite
    From the Latin for polished, this means scholarly, learned, well-read. ‘We had a particularly erudite Latin teacher who knew Cicero by heart and could also quote reams of Homer in Greek
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    dulcet
    Pronounced dull-set, but a much prettier word than that suggests: it means sweet-sounding. It’s often used ironically: ‘I thought I recognized your dulcet tones’
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    That blue dress really complements your eyes.’
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